Holding Off On “The Hunger Games”

March 23, the long-awaited release day of the much-hyped film adaptation of The Hunger Games, has come and gone. Midnight premieres have been attended, and many more fans have since seen the film. I’m a fan of the books and have been anticipating the movie, as well–I’ve jabbering about the upcoming release in real life and online for a while. But I haven’t seen the film yet, and I probably won’t for at least a week.

I do want to see it, but I’m not much for crowds and lines, and I figure I can somewhat avoid them by not going to the theater on the opening weekend. (That’s not the real reason I’m waiting. In reality, the person I promised to see it with is away for the weekend. But that’s a different story.) Of course, by waiting to see it, I run the risk of the film being spoiled by those who have.

It’s kind of hard to spoil a movie based on a book one has already read, though. Unless the script writers, who include The Hunger Games author Suzanne Collins, made some major changes to the plot, I know exactly what’s going to happen. At the same time, there’s something about seeing stills of a scene you wanted to witness in the theater or hearing exactly how an aspect was handled that detracts from the experience of anticipation.

Eventually I will see the film and there will be a belated review. Until then, I’m living like it’s March 22.

What are your thoughts on book-to-movie adaptations, and spoilage thereof?

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11 responses to “Holding Off On “The Hunger Games”

  1. Slightly underwhelming, though perhaps I was being overly critical. Will be viewing it again, and perhaps a shift in my perspective can be made.

  2. I’m skeptical of the greatness of any book-to-movie adaptations, and it isn’t often that spoilers from the book are relevant to the enjoyment of the movie. Take, for instance, Eragon (book) and Eragon (movie). Just about the only thing you could spoil from book to movie is Brom being a rider, and even that is glossed over in the movie. So I don’t think there is much to spoil in most book-to-movie adaptations, unless the movie stays exceptionally close.
    There are so many movies that are just complete fails when compared to the book that I’ve nearly given up hoping that any movie could be made out of any book more than a hundred pages long. I was extremely skeptical concerning the HG movie. Since then, I’ve seen two reviews that say it stays close to the book, which is a good sign. Also, Collins had a hand in the writing, which is often a good sign. But then again, Rick Riordan had a hand in the PJ+O movie, and that was nearly as stupid as the Eragon movie.
    So. Adaptations are terrible until proven not terrible. Spoilers will be fine unless the adaptations are proved not terrible.

    • I haven’t seen the movie version of Eragon, but I haven’t heard anything good about it. I detested the PJatO movie. I suppose it was mildly entertaining on its own, but it failed as a faithful adaptation of the book, in my humble opinion.

      • Don’t watch the movie version of Eragon. It’s the sole reason why I’ll never want any story of mine adapted as a movie unless they take blood oaths to keep exactly to the script, as if they were making another Jane Austen movie.

  3. Personally, the two book to movie adaptations I’ve seen are, Harry Potter, which I think the people did a very good job on. And the other one, The Westing Game, which was, truth be told, awful. They changed too many things in it for it to be a good movie. But from all the commercials on the radio an T.V., well, let’s just say it LOOKS good. Although, looks aren’t everything….

  4. I bought the book on March 24th and sped through it as I was intrigued with the hype. I enjoyed it and read very quickly. I will look forward to the film.

    Nearly always, the book is better, although my only examples where the opposite is true is Fight Club … And I’m struggling to remember the other film.

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